A Fake Romesco Sauce and An Exciting Month

I’ve had an exhilarating few weeks since the Green Tomato Chutney post that closed the summer growing season.

A group of chefs from El Celler de Can Roca restaurant in Girona, Spain visited Denver to create a pop-up dinner at the Halcyon Hotel a few weeks ago. A pop-up dinner is a popular concept that high-end, often Michelin Starred restaurants, do around the world to showcase their culinary creativity and bring their local traditions to a new space. Part of the Roca team’s goal with traveling to other countries or cities, is to select two (lucky) students to go to their restaurant for an all-paid four-month internship, to do so they work with a hospitality focused university in each city, which is how Metro State University of Denver was chosen, and how I got to work with the chefs and an array of hardworking students from our school during an exciting week of molecular gastronomy and Catalan specialties.

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Green Tomato Chutney – The End of the Growing Season {or maybe not}

greentomatouses

The first snow of the season brought with it change to the garden. We cut down the tomato plants and harvested all of the tomatoes that the squirrels and the hornworms have left behind; harvested the genovese and purple basils to make one last batch of pesto; and built a hoop-house on the garden bed that gets the most sun during the fall and winter, to continue cultivating salad greens, peas, carrots and beets. 

hoophouseforcoldweathervegetables

This was a great garden year. Since April, when we began harvesting the first baby arugula and lettuce leaves, followed by a hefty harvest of shelling peas, and a few handfuls of chives and tarragon. The first few harvests of the early season excited me to continue sowing seeds and eventually planting warm weather crops, like tomatoes, beans, and squashes. The flowers shone with multicolored petals dazzling the bees and butterflies, creating a beautiful nature dance through the backyard. We cultivated and harvested potatoes for the first time; had a successful carrot crop that is still going; rejoiced in abundance of greens through the entire season; and grew the biggest tomato plants we have ever seen. 

This was an abundant year. Enough for us, the bunnies, the squirrels, the hornworms, and enough to preserve for the winter months. We froze peas, golden beans {a yellow version of green beans}; canned tomato sauce, pesto, salsa verde, pickled beets and carrots, and green tomato chutney, utilizing produce grown in our backyard. Walking to the garden and harvesting vegetables, herbs, or greens for dinner is a new found pleasure that we wanted to extend through the winter when we have few local fresh ingredients here in Colorado, so Scott built a hoop house over the bed that currently hosts an array of greens, like mizuna, arugula, red leave lettuce, chard, and peas; and where I sowed more carrots, beets, radishes seeds, and some more greens to replace the current plants once their crop turns too bitter. 

mixedgreenshomegrown

On Monday, I put my boots on, a winter jacket, hat and gloves, and walked to the hoop house dusted the snow off of it and harvested salad greens for dinner. I loved it. Even with freezing cold fingers, or perhaps because of the odds of being out in the snow harvesting greens for salad, I found the experience energizing, the idea that life continues even through the devastating effects of a hard freeze on a snowy day. The power we have to protect or destroy nature, and how responsive nature can be to a caring hand.

butterflies

Before the snow, on Sunday, we thanked the garden for its hard work. We walked around the playful butterflies as they hopped from blossom to blossom, and the chickadees eating the seeds of the sunflowers I’d cut and placed on the dining room table, a trick I learned from a dear British friend who used to live next door to our former house years ago, before I ever knew what it was to care for a garden. 

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Roasted Carrots with Pesto and Hazelnuts

For the first time we have a good carrot crop growing in the garden, thanks to the netting keeping the rabbits out, plus good seeds from Seed Savers Exchange. We have harvested a few carrots each week and there are still many roots underground and many fronts blowing in the wind, plus I just sowed more for fall harvest.  I love going out to the garden and uprooting vegetables from the earth, snipping greens and herbs, and plucking squashes, tomatoes and beans. It is a primordial connection to life, to the earth, and to our true nature. 

With the summer heat the carrots get spicier and not as sweet as I’d like them, so I roast them at 400°F for 20-25 minutes in a foil pouch to make them sweet and tender. I’m not always excited to turn the oven on when is 95 degrees out, but when I do, I take the opportunity to do a large batch of roasted vegetables, like beets, carrots, cauliflower, and somehow potatoes always make it in the mix. Thankfully, it has been cool and rainy here in Colorado for the past week and today a little sun is coming through the window, the grass waking up plush and green, and the bees getting busy in the garden with the many flowers sprouting from the rain. 

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The Last Greens for Salsa Verde

Summer is holding on. Or maybe, we are holding on to summer, not letting it go, unwilling to face the inevitable winter ahead.

The growing season extends with cooler-weather produce like beets, carrots, radishes, and herbs like parley, oregano and thyme, which enjoy the comfortable low 80s and 70s we’ve had the past few weeks. In an effort to preserve every bit of the season, we picked the last of the parsley plants {all 15 of them}, and a few big beets and carrots, and used the greens to make our version of Salsa Verde.

Nearing the end of October with early September weather makes me hope that Mother Earth forgot to schedule winter this year, and that we may just skip the bitter frosty temperatures. Another less optimistic possibility points to drought. Everything is crispy around here, {except the leftover nachos from the other night.} Leaves, grasses, bushes, shrubs, are a blow away from an instant fire hazard. We look at the sky, hands up in worship, for a drop of rain, I’ll even take snow if it’s the only option, something, anything to relive the anemic moisture levels hovering around.

fallharvest

I take advantage of the extended warm season and stock on homemade preserved foods from our garden and the bounty from local farmers. This salsa verde is one of my favorite additions to the bunch, as it adds the brightness of summer to any dish and to any future snowy day.

There are many variations of salsa verde or green sauce, and its history dates back centuries. Alan Davidson says in the Oxford Companion to Food, that in England “The earliest recipes or descriptions of the sauce called for a complex mixture of green herbs,” including parsley, thyme and sorrel. He also cites a German version, which mixes the blended green herbs with sour cream, yogurt or hard-boiled eggs.

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Grilled Peach and Corn Salsa, and My New Found Obsession with Preserving

I mentioned in the past that preserving wasn’t in my DNA, well neither was English and here we are.

This season I have preserved more than the 15 years i have lived in the U.S. combined. From jams, to fruit butters, sauces, salsas, chutneys, to dried herbs and soaps. Someone told me a few years back, “You don’t have the preserving bug, yet,” to which I replied “Not sure I’ll ever get it.” I know, what a joke.

lavenderhoneypeaches

The more I dig into the pros and cons of eating seasonally, the more I learn to appreciate the bounty of fresh, Colorado grown products in the summer and fall, and align myself with the process of preparing for winter, when our diet consists mostly of root vegetables, grains, pulses, hearty greens and a few sustainably raised meats.
Preserving the summer and fall harvest allows me to go back in time by taking little capsules of flavor from my freezer or canning cellar to inject life to any meal. Let’s face it, after 3 months of parsnips and rutabagas I wish to break loose and buy an out-of-season zucchini {most likely from Mexico}, instead I add pesto to any dish from soups to pastas to beans or lentils; or chutney to meats or roasted vegetables.

peachcornsalsa

The bug hasn’t consumed me fully, I still can’t find myself canning soups and anything that requires a pressure-canning technique; even thought I’m comfortable using a pressure cooker, I’m not sure I trust a load of cans inside of it. It troubles me. Every time I consider the idea, the memories of a big pressure cooker exploding at my mother’s restaurant when I was in my early teens come rushing, and I walk away. For now, I’ll stick to water baths.

how to dry rosemary

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Lemony Carrot Greens Pesto

carrot greens and curry pesto

The garden glows. Spring harvest past its prime with the last few peas the bunnies stole and the bolted radishes and arugula left behind, giving way to beans, tomatoes, squashes, peppers, and the heat of summer.

potted eggplant

The Union Station Farmers Market bustles. With growers from Boulder, Longmont, Hygiene, Larkspur and more towns I can’t even recall, and patrons eager to taste the local harvest. Carrots and beets from Cure Organic Farms, mushrooms from the Mile High Fungi, cherries from Ela Family Farms, are just a few of the goods I found.

garden lavender

This season I’m striving to try every vegetable I see and every new, to me, idea I’ve read, like using carrot greens, for example. I’m guilty of composting the tops of many vegetables, unaware of their delicious possibilities in the kitchen. It makes me wonder, what do Colombians do with all of those tops? Feed them to animals? I have never seen a beet or radish green in the markets there and it never occurred to me they could be used in cooking.

using carrot greens

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Decoding the Artichoke

I worked with a master chef who once told me, “Artichokes are romance food. You serve a roasted artichoke with a small bowl of olive oil to a table of two and watch the lovers pick the leaves and scrape the meat on the bottom with their teeth, while looking at each other with a smile.”

My first encounter with an artichoke was less “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” and more “The Godfather”.

artichokes

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Curried-Yellow Pea “Hummus”

For 25 years I have cooked pulses {dried beans, peas and lentils} and yet, I still find road blocks from time to time, this time it was of the yellow pea kind.

After soaking the peas for a few hours, I proceeded to cook them as always. They cooked, and they cooked, and hours past, and they kept on cooking, never getting beyond “al dente”.

“What happened to the peas?” asked my husband,
“They toughened up and formed a conspiracy against me,” I replied.

Left with a pot of yellow peas, with a personality disorder that gave them the texture of a raw jicama, posed two possible outcomes:

1- Compost them and forget the incident ever happened, after all I have to protect my reputation

2- Puree them into a hummus-like spread and pretend it was intentional

And so, Curried-Yellow Pea hummus was born.

peahummus

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Leaf + Fruit + Root : Salad

Two weeks down and it’s just hitting me that I’m a teacher. The hours seem longer when I stand in front of students glaring at me as I float through words as if it were a dream. I enter panic mode when I run out of material but not of time, and make up conversation trying to shake the lethargic crowd from their modern 10 minute attention span daze.

“Any questions or thoughts on today’s lecture?” I ask
“…” crickets, and the look my dog gives me when he’s misbehaved.

I must say, teaching is as much of a learning experience for me as for my students. One thing is to know the subject one is teaching, and another is to know how to teach it. The first week, I rambled through lecture so fast, as if it were some prep I had to finish as quick as possible, and ran out of material before my time was up. Happy students, they were, getting out early on the first day of class.

On week two I brought TedTalks, videos, quotes, articles, and every imaginable trick to stretch the class and keep my subjects alive. Lecture slides finished, time left 1 hour! At least I didn’t bore them to death.

So my new goal is to work hard at the art of s-l-o-w-i-n-g-d-o-w-n. Taking my time. Looking at the world. Pacing life. Enjoying every bite.

citrus

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Rainbow Chard and Root Vegetable Salad – The Road to Recovery

I can still hear my mother shout from the kitchen “Comete las acelgas!” eat your chard. The edges of the plate crowded with leaves the color of canned green beans. Tears, rolling down my pale cheeks.

Much of my culinary scars come from early experiences of not-the-right-cooking-method syndrome. I can attest to have company on this recovery journey. A friend once told me “I never knew asparagus had crunch!”

winter salad

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